10.15.2019

Day of the Dead in Spanish Class

Inside: Resources and Ideas for The Day of the Dead or Día de los Muertos in Spanish Class


Day of the Dead in Spanish class - shared on Secondary Spanish Space



Each year many people in Mexico and beyond celebrate Día de los Muertos at the end of October and the beginning of November. We know that this time of year is hard for teacher and we are in that never ending stretch between Labor Day and Thanksgiving. (Especially for those like me that do not have any kind of fall break in that stretch). As Spanish teachers this is an excellent opportunity to mix up your normal curriculum and spend some time on a cultural celebration that students will find enlightening and interesting.


Resources & Ideas for Día de los Muertos

Each one of these posts has many resources, links and ideas all about The Day of the Dead


Activities for Day of the Dead

Films
As mentioned, this time of year is HARD and sometimes we all need a chance to catch out breath as to not burn out completely. A cultural film study may be just what the doctor ordered. In my classes, using a film is a chance for input in Spanish, as any film I show uses Spanish audio. Depending on the goals and level of class, there is an addition of subtitles (English for lower levels and Spanish subtitles for upper levels). This means students are getting practice with listening comprehension, plus the addition of the culture portrayed in a film. These are my favorite films for Día de los Muertos. (I have personally used both Coco & The Book of Life with all grades 7-12 over multiple days). These can also make a good sub plan with a guide if you are gone for Fall state language conference. (Sra. Shaw has a movie guide for any movie).

  • Day of the Dead Video - 25 min. documentary style in mostly English here

Art
Art is another cross curricular way to gain students' interest. You could create your own ofrenda for the class, or students could make them individually. Or this is a time to maybe break out a craftivity (since we all know all students are very focused on and the day after Halloween). Sometimes it is best to just embrace the crazy and have a hands on art or craft activity that relates to the culture you are studying ready on those days.


Reading
I personally love to use comprehensible cultural readings or novels in Spanish. In my own classroom I mostly use novels and texts written for Spanish learners, but if you teach upper levels or heritage learners, this is the perfect time to pull out poetry, short stories, and authentic children's books related to the topic. Below are more ideas including an authentic infographic, novel and comprehensible cultural reading.


Culture
So I realize that all of the above categories are elements of culture, but the resources below include many aspects above combined together and do not fit in a single group! These activities, projects and resources would be a great way to culminate the study of day of the Dead. Check out How to Incorporate Culture from Sherry for more ideas.



School Wide Involvement
What is better than learning and celebrating The Day of the Dead in Spanish class? Integrating the entire school and community! You could do something as simple as make a bulletin board in the lunchroom, main hall or outside your room to help educate the students and educators at your school about Halloween vs. Day of the Dead. If you teach at a Catholic school, you can integrate it with discussions, comparisons, and celebrations of All Soul's Day & All Saints Day.
If you need more ideas to reach beyond your classroom, check out the posts below:


Day of the Dead in Spanish class - shared on Secondary Spanish Space

What are your favorite ways to celebrate The Day of the Dead? Some of my personal favorite activities I have done in the past include this Calaverita song unit for upper level students, this unit for novice Spanish, followed by a Coco unit and the book Tumba

Please share what you are doing in the comments!


Hispanic Heritage Month in Spanish Class - Secondary Spanish Space

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